CALL US TODAY 877-763-5111

  • Banner1

When does the I-9 need to be completed?

HR Topics Question

All new employees must complete Section 1 of Form I-9 on or before their first day of employment. Then, within three business days of their start date, they should submit acceptable proof of their identity and eligibility to work in the United States.  As the employer, you should complete Section 2 within those same three business days. If the duration of the job will be fewer than three days, you should complete Section 2 no later than the first day of employment. Section 2 is generally done at the time the employee brings in their identifying documents, as it asks for specific information about these forms of identification. Content provided by TPC HR Support Center.

Read More

We have an employee who is joining the Army Reserves. What are our responsibilities as their employer?

HR Topics Question

In short, your responsibilities are to not discriminate because of their service and to offer them their job back after military-related absences.  The rights of applicants and employees who serve in the uniformed military services are protected by the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Act (USERRA). Under this act, it is unlawful for an employer to discriminate in hiring, reemployment, retention, promotion, pay, or any benefit of employment due to a person’s military service or intent to apply for military service.  You should allow the employee to take unpaid leave to attend deployments, scheduled drills, and annual training. When the employee returns, they s

Read More

EEO-1 Reporting Requirements Finalized

The hotly contested issue of what exactly needs to be filed for EEO-1 reporting this year has been resolved—at least for now. Pay data for both 2017 and 2018 must be reported to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) by September 30, 2019. The data that has been required in years past is still due by May 31, 2019. An appeal of the latest decision has been filed, so it's possible that there could be yet another change to the requirements, but employers should plan to comply with these deadlines, as described below.  Does my business even need to file the EEO-1 report?If you have fewer than 100 employees and no federal contracts, you are not subject to EEO-1 re

Read More

Question: Can we give employees different amounts of vacation or PTO time?

HR Topics Question

Answer: If the differing amounts of vacation or PTO are based on a clearly-defined employee groupings, such as seniority, department, or exempt versus non-exempt status, then yes. It’s a common practice, for example, for employers to offer more vacation time to employees who have been with the organization for longer.  Where you can run into trouble is offering different amounts of vacation on an individual basis or without clearly-defined criteria, either of which can lead to discrimination claims. For instance, if Rafik and Anita are hired at the same time for similar jobs in the accounting department at the same rate of pay, but the organization offers Rafik more vacation, Anita

Read More

EEO-1 Reporting Requirements Finalized

The hotly contested issue of what exactly needs to be filed for EEO-1 reporting this year has been resolved—at least for now. Pay data for both 2017 and 2018 must be reported to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) by September 30, 2019. The data that has been required in years past is still due by May 31, 2019. An appeal of the latest decision has been filed, so it's possible that there could be yet another change to the requirements, but employers should plan to comply with these deadlines, as described below.  Does my business even need to file the EEO-1 report?If you have fewer than 100 employees and no federal contracts, you are not subject to EEO-1 reporting re

Read More

The Three Ways HR Makes Employment More Profitable

HR covers a lot of territory—much of it cluttered with paperwork—but it really does have a precise business purpose. The point of HR is to make employment more profitable. HR does this in three fundamental ways. First, HR protects the organization against employment-related lawsuits and fines. Second, it reduces the costs of employment. And third, it maximizes employee productivity. In short, HR helps the employer save money and make money in all things related to employment.   Protection from Lawsuits and Fines Nothing can prevent an employer from being sued, but good HR can substantially reduce the risk of lawsuits and other costly consequences of non-compliance by e

Read More

What is an employee’s regular rate of pay? Is it just what they make per hour of work?

Not exactly. An employee’s “regular rate of pay” is the amount used to calculate their overtime rate for a given time period. You might think of it as an average, of sorts. An employee’s regular rate is determined by adding up the amount paid for their work, as well as earnings from non-discretionary bonuses (such as those tied to performance or retention), then dividing that amount by the total hours worked.    For example, let’s say Anna earns $10/hour for inside sales work and $15/hour for bookkeeping work. This week, she worked 24 hours in inside sales and 20 hours as a bookkeeper. She also received $50 in commissions that are attributable to this workweek. H

Read More

Conflict Resolution Strategies

hr outsourcing

The recipe for workplace conflict is decidedly simple: bring two or more people together and assign them a task. Unless the stars have aligned in your favor, there’s going to be some cause for disagreement between them, and if conflict ensues, their ability to cooperate will suffer. Regrettably, too often employers tolerate unresolved conflict because it isn’t a legal matter with potential fines, they’re busy with other things, they don’t know how to manage it, or because doing so is sure to be uncomfortable. But unresolved conflict is one of the most dangerous threats to an organization because it prevents people from collaborating and working efficiently, and successful teamwor

Read More

What You Need to Know Before Disciplining or Terminating an Employee

The prospect of corrective action or termination makes a lot of managers nervous. That’s understandable. For employees, being disciplined or losing their job can be anything from moderately embarrassing to financially devastating, but it’s rarely a happy occasion. For the employers, these actions always come with some risk, and there are plenty of legal danger zones an employer can end up in if corrective action isn’t done properly. Here are some tips from our HR Pros to help you avoid these pitfalls and make corrective action productive for everyone:  Everyone in the organization, but especially those responsible for disciplining or terminating employees, should understand

Read More

Governor Cracks Down on Employee Misclassification

Earlier this month Governor Evers issued Executive Order 20 (EO), which will ultimately lead to a crackdown on misclassification of employees as independent contractors. The EO calls for creation of a joint task force of leaders from the state Department of Workforce Development, Attorney General’s office, Workers’ Compensation and Unemployment Insurance Divisions, and several other state agencies.  The task force has been given numerous objectives, some of which are fairly administrative, but it’s clear that its primary focus is enforcement and a push for increased reporting of misclassification. The Governor cited the impact on vulnerable populations that are misclassified (

Read More