CALL US TODAY 877-763-5111

  • Banner1

Can we ask an applicant why they are leaving their current job?

Yes. While it’s fine to ask this question during the interview, we recommend you collect this information ahead of time by asking about it on an employment application. In the section where the applicant lists their previous employment experience, you can ask for the reason they left each job. Trends you notice may be cause for follow-up questions during the interview or a reason not to schedule an interview at all. If you ask about previous or current employment during the interview, be mindful of the direction the response goes. As with any interview question, you should redirect the candidate if they start to share sensitive information. For example, if a candidate says they left pa

Read More

Five Reasons to Rehire Former Employees

It’s not uncommon for organizations to have a policy against rehiring former employees. This sort of policy makes perfect sense with respect to troublemakers, poor performers, or others who left under a dark cloud. It’s also understandable given that companies invest a lot of money training and developing their people, and employees who go elsewhere take that investment with them, sometimes to a competitor. But times have changed, and expectations with them. Few employers these days expect employees to stick around for many years. Most know that employees will move between employers multiple times over the course of their career and that many of them will even change careers entirel

Read More

We don’t typically do background checks, but we’re hiring a driver who will be operating a company vehicle. We want to do a background check for this position, but since we’ve never done one for anyone else, we’re worried it would look discriminatory.

You may conduct a background check for this job even though you haven’t done one for others. You can elect to run a background check on only certain positions based on the nature of a position, but you'll want to be consistent for all individuals in a specific position. if you only ran a check on this candidate, that could certainly appear discriminatory. Additionally, as a best practice, we recommend that background checks be done after a conditional offer of employment has been made. In this case, it would be logical to look for and consider DUIs, traffic tickets, and any convictions related to the work the candidate would do for you. We would recommend, however, against making a hir

Read More

Year-End ACA Reporting

Can you believe year end is almost here? I know - time sure flies when you are having fun. There are many tasks that come with year-end wrap-up, and fortunately iSolved has the ability to help you with most of those tasks. One of these tasks is ACA reporting: After a few setup items, iSolved is able to populate your 1094s and 1095s - and we can then handle the printing and filing for you. You are required to report if you are an applicable large employer (ALE). What is an ALE? According to the IRS, an ALE is a company who "has at least 50 full-time employees, including full-time equivalent employees, on average during the prior year.” Essentially, if you had an average of 50 fu

Read More

When does the I-9 need to be completed?

All new employees must complete Section 1 of Form I-9 on or before their first day of employment. Then, within three business days of their start date, they should submit acceptable proof of their identity and eligibility to work in the United States.  As the employer, you should complete Section 2 within those same three business days. If the duration of the job will be fewer than three days, you should complete Section 2 no later than the first day of employment. Section 2 is generally done at the time the employee brings in their identifying documents, as it asks for specific information about these forms of identification. Content provided by TPC HR Support Center.

Read More

Why You Should Care About Your Employer Brand

Lots of HR leaders today are talking about the importance of using marketing techniques to build an effective employer brand. The topic was a focus in several sessions at the latest annual Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) conference.  What is an employer brand? To answer that question, it may be helpful to go over what a brand is in general. A brand is a name, image, or some other feature that distinguishes your products and services from those offered by others.  Branding may sound simple, but as any marketing team can tell you, a lot of thought and work goes into it, and the difference between success and failure couldn’t be starker. If you call to mind successfu

Read More

DOL Releases Final Overtime Rule, Effective Jan 1, 2020

The Department of Labor has announced the new minimum salary for certain exempt white collar employees. The final rule is very close to the proposed rule we reported on in March. The new minimums will take effect January 1, 2020. Exempt Executive, Administrative, Professional and Computer Employees (EAP)Salaried exempt EAP employees must be paid at least $684 per week on a salary basis (an increase from the current minimum of $455 per week). This is the equivalent of $35,568 per year. Up to 10% of this minimum may come from non-discretionary bonuses, incentive payments, and commissions (collectively, “incentive pay”), so long as these payments are received on at least an annual ba

Read More

Our employees are required to attend sexual harassment prevention training. Do we need to pay for their time at training?

If an employer requires attendance at a training, then it generally must be paid. While this training may often be directed because of a state law, it is ultimately an employer-directed activity.  Department of Labor guidance is that trainings and work events can only be non-work time (unpaid under the Fair Labor Standards Act) if all four of the following criteria are met: The training occurs outside of the employee's normal work hours;The training is completely voluntary (there will be no company-initiated consequences if the employee does not attend);The training is not specifically job-related (it may be tangentially related to their job, such as most continuing education

Read More

A New Approach to Service Awards

Many of us know that employee recognition and workplace culture have become critical components in retention, especially given the ongoing challenge of a tight labor market. To that end, perhaps you’ve designed a dynamic performance management and goal setting system for your employees. Or maybe you offer some great benefits for a flexible work/life balance. And we all know scheduling fun events – holiday parties, summer picnics, social outings – can go a long way to create a welcoming and positive workplace. Among all these efforts, though, sometimes employers lose sight of a long-standing piece of employee recognition: service awards. Length-of-service awards, also called achieve

Read More

The Three Ways HR Makes Employment More Profitable

HR covers a lot of territory—much of it cluttered with paperwork—but it really does have a precise business purpose. The point of HR is to make employment more profitable. HR does this in three fundamental ways. First, HR protects the organization against employment-related lawsuits and fines. Second, it reduces the costs of employment. And third, it maximizes employee productivity. In short, HR helps the employer save money and make money in all things related to employment.   Protection from Lawsuits and Fines Nothing can prevent an employer from being sued, but good HR can substantially reduce the risk of lawsuits and other costly consequences of non-compliance by e

Read More