CALL US TODAY 877-763-5111

  • Banner1

Leading During a Pandemic

No one knows what the workplace is going to look like in three months. COVID-19 continues to spread. School reopening and attendance plans remain tenuous. Further action from Congress is uncertain. Official rules from the Department of Labor might even be struck down in court, further adding to the confusion about what employers are supposed to be doing.  Leading an organization right now can feel like driving to a destination you’re not sure exists on a road that’s changing right before you.  In this situation, we need to accept that the typical ways of leading a team may not prove successful. The simple question of what success looks like right now isn’t easy to answ

Read More

DOL Release New Back-to-School FFCRA Guidance

Ever since it became clear that not all schools would be fully reopening for the new school year, employers and employees alike have been wondering how the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) would apply in the variety of new schooling scenarios. Yesterday, the Department of Labor released several new Questions and Answers that address those issues, quoted below: Question 98: My child’s school is operating on an alternate day (or other hybrid-attendance) basis. The school is open each day, but students alternate between days attending school in person and days participating in remote learning. They are permitted to attend school only on their allotted in-person atte

Read More

6 Tips to Help You Manage Stress in the Workplace

We’re all supposed to feel stress from time to time. It’s the way the body responds to demands and dangers. A stressful event triggers the release of hormones. These hormones, according to Psychology Today, “increase heartbeat and the circulation of blood to support quick action, mobilize fat and sugar for immediate energy, focus attention to track the danger, prepare muscles for movement, and more.” This fight-or-flight response helps us overcome these challenges. It can save our life before we realize we’re in danger.  We are not, however, supposed to feel stress all or most of the time. Stress, particularly the regular or chronic variety, can le

Read More

FFCRA Leave – Significant Rule Changes

A federal court in New York recently struck down four federal Department of Labor (DOL) rules related to the leaves provided by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). As a result, certain aspects of the FFCRA are now more favorable to employees. Unfortunately, it’s not clear if the ruling applies nationwide or only in the Southern District of New York, where that court is located. Until there is further activity in the case—which may clarify whether the rules remain intact throughout the rest of the country—we recommend that employers err on the side of caution when administering FFCRA leaves and assume these particular rules no longer apply.  What is clear is th

Read More

Making the Workplace a Safe Place to Speak Up

Right now, organizations across the country are asking themselves what they can do to make their workplaces more inclusive, diverse, and equitable, particularly for Black employees. They’re hosting conversations, acknowledging areas where they’ve fallen short, and identifying opportunities for improvement.  For these efforts to be successful, employees need to be able to speak freely, offering critical and candid feedback about individual behaviors, workplace practices, and organizational policies. None of this can happen, however, if people believe it isn’t safe for them to speak up.  It often isn’t. Employees who report harassment and discrimination, speak candi

Read More

Responding to Anonymous Complaints: Dos and Don’ts

If you receive an anonymous complaint, it is important to remain calm and review the complaint objectively regardless of how egregious the accusations may seem. Although the complaint was received anonymously, the company still has an obligation to take action, if necessary, to ensure that employees are provided a workplace that is safe and free from harassing or discriminatory conduct. We recommend investigating the complaint to the extent possible given the information received. Here are dos and don’ts to keep in mind: Do: Determine if an investigation is warranted or possible. Some complaints will not require an investigation, and some may not even require follow up (e.g., per

Read More

Join TPC to Support the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association’s Heart Walk has had a change of plans but not a change of "Heart". Due to the current pandemic, the walk has become a “walk where you are” event. The individual teams that were registered for the walk are now walking on their own, but still for the same cause! Our very own, Carrie Falk, Senior Account Manager at TPC, is on the Executive Leadership Team of the American Heart Association’s (AHA) 2020 Madison Heart Walk. In that role she works with the AHA Executive Director, Carrie Nevins, to engage top companies and leaders to join in the American Heart Association’s mission. The Madison Heart Walk is an annual event that consists of a walk and 5K

Read More

A manager of ours, who is exempt, is taking a half-day to attend a social event even though they’ve exhausted all of their paid time off. Can we reduce their salary for that day?

HR Topics Question

Not for half day, no. As a general rule, if an exempt employee performs any work during the workweek, they must be paid their full salary. If the employee were taking off one or more full days for this social event, then a deduction from their salary would be permissible. A half day, however, does not qualify for a deduction. That said, if the employee has paid time off (PTO) available, you could deduct from that bank of hours for a partial or full day absence—this is not considered a salary deduction since they will still get their regular pay as a result of using PTO. Here are the situations in which deductions from salary are generally permissible for exempt employees: For any wo

Read More

What Employers Should Do If an Employee Makes a Racist Statement Online

Given renewed national attention on issues of racial equity and justice, employees and customers might be more inclined to report incidents of racism they witness in person or on the internet. In this article, we cover some recommended practices for employers if they receive a report that an employee has made a racist statement online. Don’t ignore itWe recommend responding to the report, whether it’s made by an employee, customer, or vendor. Not responding could lead to an escalation of the situation. First, the offending post might be shared widely and result in additional pressure on you to take action. Second, not responding right away (or after additional complaints) could lead

Read More

Supreme Court Rules in Favor of LGBTQ Employment Protections

The Supreme Court of the United States has ruled that employers may not discriminate based on sexual orientation or gender identity in employment. This decision affects all employers with 15 or more employees. The decision was a response to three separate cases, all of which were about employment discrimination based on “sex” under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which applies to all employers with 15 or more employees. There has been debate for years about the definition of sex under Title VII. Originally, many assumed that it meant only that men and women could not be treated differently, but over the years the Supreme Court has interpreted the definition to include cert

Read More